Posted in Day Trip, Education, History, life, Travel

Have you met Dippy?

Meet Dippy the Diplodocus. He’s on tour around the UK having left the Natural History Museum in London for the first time since 1905. His show is on the road until 2020 and is next heading to Newcastle on 18th May, having just wrapped up a several month stint in Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum.

Dippy is a beautiful big beastie who originally roamed the earth 150 million years ago, munching on leaves and hanging out with his dino friends. I can’t help but be reminded of The Land Before Time and Disney’s Dinosaur, so excuse me while I wipe away my tears.

If you are a paleo purist (ancient bones, not the diet) then maybe Dippy wasn’t your thing, he is a replica – plaster cast of the original Dippy in residence in Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Natural History. However, I don’t care, because it’s thanks to Andrew Carnegie, a Scottish-American industrialist and philanthropist, that we over here have a Dippy to look at! Carnegie financed the excavation of Dippy in Wyoming in 1899 and they later discovered it was a new species, thus named the
Diplodocus carnegii. As a favour to King Edward VII, Carnegie faithfully reproduced the bones of the original at the cost of $2000 back in 1902 and gifted them to the Natural History museum in London.

Most people know how much Kelvingrove means to me, it’s my hang out place when I can get there; where my interests in art, history and old buildings converges so for that to be the temporary home of Dippy’s Scottish visit, I couldn’t have asked for more. Picture it, me in all my 30 years turning up with my pater and the two of us nerding out worse than the kids swarming around.

Dippy is 70ft long, no wonder it’s hard to get him in one shot!

Even though the photos show other people as scale, it still doesn’t do justice to how massive Dippy actually is. He towered over the adults, nevermind the kids and weighs in at a hefty 20,000kg (alive, I’m sure).

Smile for the camera

I had to zoom in to get his wee face, and felt so small and insignificant. Really makes me wonder about people who deny the existence of dinosaurs – we might mostly be top of the food chain these days, but we’re all fairly tiny and annoying.

Colossus at rest

It was a great day out to visit Dippy and I can only hope that there have been countless children inspired by seeing him. I may have ended up at the merch shop and may have acquired a Dippy soft toy for a small fortune…

Kelvingrove is a free-entry museum and is open nearly all year-round from 10/11-5pm everyday. There are accessible entry points from both the Argyle Street and car park entrance. There are two cafés serving hot and cold drinks and light foods, the basement café serving meals as well. The basement features different installations and the two gift shops sell the permanent and temporary merchandise. There is artwork from Dalí and the Dutch Masters to the exhibits of Ancient Egypt and Scottish Wildlife, so there is definitely something for all to see.

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Posted in Books

Currently Reading – Flawed

So at the time of writing this I’m currently reading Flawed by Cecelia Ahern. I love her writing and her style. To be fair I haven’t read all of her stuff, but of what I have read, I’ve loved. The wit, the whimsy, the unbelievable – she makes it real, she makes you care. Now this is a slight departure from her usual stuff, it’s YA for starters and it’s the first in a series. I should warn you before you read any further, if you are sick to the back teeth of YA dystopian novels, then stop reading and await my next blog, if not then keep reading – but you have been warned!

I won’t give away spoilers but to say that at just over halfway through, I can already see the familiar triangle forming, the reluctant teen forced into a situation in which she must give up her desire to flee and instead learn to fight. Everything she took for granted is now gone, those she trusted are no longer trustworthy etc. But, I don’t even care! There is another different edge to this story, it’s not Hunger Games targeting the kids, it’s targeting everyone – a bit more Minority Report in its brand of justice. Effectively, there are a list of things a member of ordinary society must abide by, lest they be tried and condemned as Flawed, at which point they are branded with a perfect F… the irony isn’t lost on the narrator. Celestine is seventeen, and as annoying as most studious seventeen-year-olds are, more concerned with following the rules to a tee and her future life at uni than whether her world is fair and just for all. As she is annoying, this will allow for the greatest character development, she is falling fast and when she hits bottom, then I can feel sorry for her. Too many main characters start off as noble, likeable, honorable, selfless, etc, whereas Celestine is a proper teenager; bitchy, moody, out of her depth, and rightfully pissed off at her treatment.

I’m still trying to decipher the landscape, perhaps like most Ahern books it is set in Ireland or at least a fictional version, thus it already has a different taste than the deluge of American world dystopias. This book has been on my TBR pile for a while but I’m glad I’m cracking on with it, it’s fun and enjoyable! Who decided that there can only be one bestseller of each genre? Who decided that after Hunger Games, Maze Runner, and Divergent that the world had tired of YA dystopians? Because according to the sheer volume of such books that are being sold in print and on Kindle, it’s not coming from the readers!

luego,

e x